1960 Rubricæ Generales Breviarii Romani (in English)

I General Norms 1-3

II The Liturgical Day in General 4-20

III Ferias 21-27

V Vigils 28-34

VI Feasts and Calendar 35-62

VII Octaves 63-70

VIII The Seasons of the Year 71-77

IX The Saturday Celebration of the Blessed Virgin Mary 78-79

X THE Greater and Lesser Litanies 80-90

XI The Precedence of Liturgical Days 91

XII The Occurrence of Liturgical Days 02-94

XIII The Accidental Occurrence of Liturgical Days and Their Transference 95-99

XIV The Perpetual Occurrence of Liturgical Days and Their Reassignment 100-102

XV The Concurrence of Liturgical Days 103-105

XVI Commemorations 106-114

XVII The Conclusion of Prayers 115-116

XVIII The Colors of the Vestments 117-137

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I General Norms

1. The following rubrics are concerned with the Roman rite.

2. By "calendar" is meant both the calendar of the universal Church and particular calendars.

3. The general rubrics which follow apply to breviary and missal alike. Exceptions are made to them, however, by means of particular rubrics which occur at certain places in the breviary and the missal edited according to these rubrics.

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II The Liturgical Day in General

4. A liturgical day is a day sanctified by liturgical services, especially the sacrifice of the Mass and the Church's public prayer, that is, the divine office. It runs from midnight to midnight.

5. Of itself, the celebration of a liturgical day runs from matins through compline. There are more solemn days, however, whose office begins with 1st Vespers on the preceding day. Finally, there is a liturgical celebration which is not a full celebration but only a commemoration in the office and Mass of the current liturgical day.

6. On each day the celebration is either of a Sunday, or of a feria, or of a vigil, or of a feast, or of an octave, according to the calendar and the precedence of the liturgical days.

7. The precedence among the different liturgical days is determined solely by a special table (no. 91).

8. Liturgical days are of the first, second, third or fourth class.

9. Sunday (Dominica) is the Lord's day occurring at the beginning of each week.

10. Sundays are of the 1st or 2nd class.

11. Sundays of the 1st class are:

a) the four Sundays of Advent;

b) the four Sundays of Lent;

c) the two Sundays of the Passion;

d) the Sunday of the Resurrection or Easter Sunday;

e) Low Sunday;

f) Pentecost Sunday.

Easter and Pentecost Sunday are likewise feasts of the 1st class with octaves.

12. All other Sundays are of the 2nd class.

13. The office of a Sunday begins with 1st vespers on the Saturday preceding, and ends after compline of the Sunday.

14. The Sunday is celebrated on its own day, according to the rubrics. The office and Mass of an impeded Sunday are neither anticipated nor resumed.

15. In a case of occurrence, a Sunday of the 1st class is preferred to any feast whatsoever.
The feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, however, is preferred to the Sunday of Advent on which it may occur.
With regard to concurrence, the rules given in nos. 104-105 will be observed.

16. In a case of occurrence, a Sunday of the 2nd class is preferred to feasts of the 2nd class.

However:

a) a 1st or 2nd class feast of the Lord occurring on a Sunday of the 2nd class takes the place of the Sunday itself with all its rights and privileges; hence, there is no commemoration of the Sunday;

b) a Sunday of the 2nd class is preferred to the commemoration of All the Faithful Departed. With regard to concurrence, the rules given in nos. 104-105 will be observed.

17. Of itself, Sunday excludes the permanent assignment of a feast.

Exceptions are as follows:

a) The feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, to be celebrated on the Sunday which occurs from January 2 to 5 (otherwise, on January 2);

b) the feast of the Holy Family, Jesus, Mary and Joseph, to be celebrated on the First Sunday after Epiphany;

c) the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, to be celebrated on the last Sunday of Pentecost;

d) the feast of our Lord Jesus Christ the King, to be celebrated on the last Sunday of October;

e) first class feasts of the Lord which are now assigned to 2nd class Sundays in particular calendars.

These feasts take the place of the occurring Sunday with all its rights and privileges; hence, there is no commemoration of the Sunday.

18. The Sundays after Epiphany which are impeded by the occurrence of Septuagesima are transferred after the Twenty-third Sunday after Pentecost, in this order:

a) if there are 25 Sundays after Pentecost, the 24th Sunday will be that which is entitled the Sixth Sunday after Epiphany;

b) if there are 26 Sundays, the 24th Sunday will be that which is entitled the Fifth Sunday after Epiphany; and the 25th, that which is entitled the 6th;

c) if there are 27 Sundays, the 24th Sunday will be that which is entitled the Fourth Sunday after Epiphany; the 25th, that which is entitled the 5th; and the 26th that with is entitled the 6th;

d) if there are 28 Sundays, the 24th Sunday will be that which is entitled the Third Sunday after Epiphany; the 25th , that which is entitled the 4th; the 26th that which is entitled the 5th; and the 27th that which is entitled the 6th.

That which is 24th in order after Pentecost, however, is always put in the last place. Any for which a place cannot be found, through the working of this rule, are omitted.

19. By the first Sunday of a month is meant the Sunday which occurs first in that month, namely from the first to the seventh day of the month. By the last Sunday of a month is meant the Sunday next preceding the first day of the following month.

Thus, in computing the first Sunday of the months of August, September, October and November to determine the readings of the occurring Scripture, that Sunday which falls from the first to the seventh day of the month is called the first Sunday of the month.

20. The First Sunday of Advent is the Sunday which falls on November 30 or is closest to that date.

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III Ferias

21. The name "feria" is applied to the individual days of the week aside from Sunday.

22. Ferias are of the first, second, third or fourth class.

23. Ferias of the 1st class are:

a) Ash Wednesday;

b) all the ferias of Holy Week.

These ferias are preferred to any feasts whatsoever, and they admit of no commemoration, except one of the privileged class.

24. Ferias of the 2nd class are:

a) the ferias of Advent from December 17 to 23;

b) ember days of Advent, Lent and September.

These ferias are preferred to particular feasts of the 2nd class. If impeded, they are to be commemorated.

25. Ferias of the 3rd class are:

a) ferias of Lent and passiontide other than those mentioned above, from Thursday after Ash Wednesday to Saturday before the 2nd Sunday of the Passion inclusive, which are preferred to feasts of the 3rd class;

b) ferias of Advent other than those mentioned above, to December 16 inclusive, which yield to feasts of the 3rd class.

If these ferias are impeded, they are to be commemorated.

26. All ferias not mentioned in nos. 23-25 are ferias of the 4th class.

They are never commemorated.

27. The office of a feria begins with matins and ends, of itself, after compline. The office of a Saturday, however, except that of Holy Saturday, ends after none.

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V Vigils

28. By "vigil" is understood a liturgical day which precedes some feast and has the nature of a preparation for the feast.

The Easter vigil, however, since it is not a liturgical day, is celebrated in its own way, as a night watch.

29. Vigils are of the first, second or third class.

30. Vigils of the 1st class are:

a) the vigil of Christmas, which, if it occurs on the Fourth Sunday of Advent, takes the place of that Sunday, excluding even a commemoration of it;

b) the vigil of Pentecost.

These vigils are preferred to any feast whatsoever, and they admit no commemoration.

31. Vigils of the 2nd class are:

a) the vigil of the Ascension of our Lord;

b) the vigil of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary;

c) the vigil of the Birthday of St. John the Baptist;

d) the vigil of SS. Peter and Paul, apostles.

These vigils are preferred to liturgical days of the 3rd and 4th class.

If impeded, they are commemorated, according to the rubrics.

32. Vigils of the 3rd class is the vigil of St. Lawrence.

This vigil is preferred to liturgical days of the 4th class. If impeded, it is commemorated, according to the rubrics.

33. A vigil of the 2nd or 3rd class is omitted altogether if it occurs on any Sunday or on a feast of the 1st class, or if the feast to which it is prefixed happens to be transferred to another day or reduced to a commemoration.

34. The office of a vigil begins with matins and ends when the office of the following feast begins.

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VI Feasts and Calendar

A. Nature and Classification of Feasts

35. By "feasts" is understood a liturgical day on which the Church's public worship is directed in a special way to the celebration of the mysteries of the Lord or to the veneration of the Blessed Virgin Mary or the angels or saints or blessed.

36. Feasts are of the first, second or third class.

37. The plan for the celebration of feasts is this:

a) feasts of the 1st class are among the more solemn days, whose office begins with 1st vespers on the preceding day;

b) feasts of the 2nd and 3rd class have an office which of itself runs from matins to compline of the day itself;

c) second class feasts of the Lord, however, acquire 1st vespers whenever they take the place of 2nd class Sundays in cases of occurrence.

38. Feasts are universal or particular; particular feasts, in turn are proper or indult.

39. Universal feasts are those which are inscribed by the Holy See in the calendar of the universal Church.

These feasts are to be celebrated, according to the rubrics, by all those who follow the Roman rite.

40. Particular feasts are those which are inscribed in particular calendars by right or by indult from the Holy See.

These feasts are to be celebrated, according to the rubrics, by all those who are bound by that particular calendar; and they cannot be dropped from the calendar or changed in rank except by special indult of the Holy See.

41. Particular feasts to be inscribed in the calendar by their own right are the feasts proper:

a) to any nation and any region or province, whether ecclesiastical or civil (no. 42);

b) to any diocese or ecclesiastical territory headed by a "local ordinary" (no. 43);

c) to any place or town or city (no. 44);

d) to any church, or public or semi-public oratory which takes the place of a church (no. 45);

e) to any order or congregation (no. 46).

42. Feasts proper to any nation and any region or province, whether ecclesiastical or civil, are:

a) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron (1st class);

b) the feast of a duly constituted secondary patron (2nd class).

43. Feasts proper to any diocese or ecclesiastical territory headed by a "local ordinary", are:

a) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron (1st class);

b) the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral church (1st class);

c) the feast of a duly constituted secondary patron (2nd class);

d) feasts of saints and blessed who have been duly inscribed in the martyrology or in its appendix, and who have some special relationship to the diocese, such as having been there born, or having lived there a long time, or having died there (2nd and 3rd class or commemoration).

44. Feast proper to any place or town or city are:

a) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron (1st class);

b) the feast of a duly constituted secondary patron (2nd class).

45. Feasts proper to any church, or public or semi-public oratory which takes the place of a church, are:

a) the anniversary of the dedication, if they are consecrated (1st class);

b) the titular feast, if they are consecrated or at least solemnly blessed (1st class);

c) the feast of a saint duly inscribed in the martyrology or in its appendix, whose body is kept there (2nd class);

d) the feast of a blessed duly inscribed in the matyrology or in its appendix, whose body is kept there (3rd class).

46. Feasts proper to any order or congregation, are:

a) the titular feast (1st class);

b) the feast of a founder who has been canonized (1st class) or beatified (2nd class);

c) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron of the whole order or congregation, throughout the order of the congregation; the feast of a duly constituted principal patron of any religious province, in that province (1st class);

d) the feast of a seconday patron, as above (2nd class);

e) the feasts of saints and blessed who were members of that order or congregation (2nd or 3rd class or commemoration).

47. Particular indult feasts are feasts which are inscribed in particular calendars by indult of the Holy See.

B. The Calendar and the Feasts to be Inscribed in It

48. A calendar is universal or particular, that is , proper.

49. The universal calendar is the calendar used by the universal Church, which is prefixed to the Roman breviary and missal.

50. A particular or proper calendar is diocesan or religious. It is made up by inserting particular feasts into the universal calendar.

A permanent particular calendar of this kind is to be made up respectively by the local ordinary or by the highest religious superior with the advice of his chapter or general council, and it subject to the approval of the Sacred Congregation of Rites.

51. All dioceses and all other ecclesiastical territories headed by a "local ordinary" have a diocesan calendar.

52. To be inscribed in the diocesan calendar, besides the universal feasts, are:

a) the proper (no. 42) and indult feasts of the whole nation and of the whole region or province, whether ecclesiastical or civil;

b) the proper (no. 43) and indult feasts of the whole diocese.

53. Upon a diocesan calendar of this kind is built:

a) the calendar of each locality, by adding the proper (no. 44) and indult feasts;

b) the calendar of each church or oratory, likewise by adding the proper (no. 44) and indult feasts of the locality and also the proper (no. 45) and indult feasts of the church itself;

c) the calendar of the religious congregations or institutes of pontifical right which are not bound to the recitation of the divine office; and of congregations of diocesan right, by adding the proper (no.44) and indult feasts of the locality; as well as other feasts proper to them (nos. 45 and 46) and granted to them by indult.

54. The following have a religious calendar:

a) regular orders, and the nuns and sisters of those orders, as well as the tertiaries associated with them, living in common and making simple vows;

b) religious congregations or institutes of either sex, of pontifical right, and set up under the government of one general head, if they are bound to the recitation of the diving office in any way.

55. In a religious calendar are to be inscribed, besides the universal feasts, the proper (no. 46) and indult feasts of that order or congregation.

56. Upon a religious calendar of this kind is built:

a) the calendar of each religious province, by adding the proper (no. 46) and indult feasts;

b) the calendar of each church or oratory, likewise by adding the proper (no. 45) and indult feasts, as well as the others enumerated in the following section; this is also called the calendar of the religious house.

57. In each diocese and locality the religious, including those who follow a rite other than the Roman, are bound to celebrate together with the diocesan clergy:

a) the feast of a principal patron of the nation, of the region or province, whether ecclesiastical or civil, of the diocese, of the place or town or city (1st class);

b) the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral church (1st class);

c) other feasts actually kept as holidays, if there are any, with the same rank with which they are inscribed in the diocesan calendar.

58. In celebrating the feasts of saints of their order or congregation, with regard to the date and the use of an office more proper than that used by the universal Church, religious are bound to conform to the diocesan clergy wherever the same saints are honored as principal patrons (no. 57a).

Thus, if the feasts of saints or blessed of some order or congregation are celebrated with a higher rank or with a more proper office by the clergy of some diocese or locality, they may be celebrated in the same place also by religious of that order or congregation with the same higher rank or more proper office; as long as the same feasts are inscribed on the same day in both calendars.

C. The Proper Day of Feasts

59. Feasts already introduced into calendars shall be celebrated on the day on which they are now inscribed in the calendars.

60. For the introduction of new universal feasts, the following shall be observed:

a) the feasts of saints shall ordinarily be assigned to the birthday, that is, the day on which the saint was born to eternal life; if this day is impeded for any reason, the feast shall be assigned to a day to be determined by the Holy See, which day shall accordingly be regarded as the quasi-birthday;

b) for the rest of the feasts, a day will be assigned by the Holy See.

61. For the introduction of new particular feasts, the following shall be observed:

a) proper feasts of saints or blessed shall ordinarily be assigned to the birthday, unless it is impeded or some other arrangement has been made with the Holy See; but feasts proper to some locality or church which are also inscribed in the universal or diocesan or religious calendar with a lower rank, are to be celebrated on the same day on which they occur in the universal or diocesan or religious calendar;

b) if the birthday is not known, the feast shall be assigned, with the approval of the Holy See, to a day which is of the fourth class in the perpetual diocesan or religious calendar;

c) if the birthday is permanently impeded, however, for the whole diocese or religious order or for the proper church, feasts in a particular calendar of this kind, if they are of the 1st or 2nd class, shall be assigned to the next day which is not on the 1st or 2nd class; if they are of the 3rd class, they shall be assigned to the next day which is free of other feasts and offices of equal or higher rank;

d) particular indult feasts shall be inscribed in the calendar on the day assigned by the Holy See in the grant.

62. Saints or blessed who for any reason are combined in the calendar with a single feast are always celebrated together as indicated in the breviary, as long as they are to be honored by the same rank, even if one or more of them are more proper. On the other hand:

a) if one or more of these saints are to be honored by a feast of the 1st class, the office shall be of these only, to the exclusion of the companions;

b) if one or more of these saints or blessed are more proper and are to be honored by a higher rank, the whole office shall be of those who are more proper, with a commemoration of the companions.

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VII Octaves

A. Octaves in General

63. An octave is a celebration of the highest feasts prolonged for eight successive days.

64. Only the octaves of Christmas, Easter and Pentecost are celebrated, to the exclusion of all others, whether in the universal calendar or in particular calendars.

65. Octaves are of the 1st or 2nd class.

B. Octaves of the 1st Class

66. Octaves of the 1st class are the octaves of Easter and Pentecost.

The days within these octaves are of the 1st class.

C. Octaves of the 2nd Class

67. The octave of the second class is the octave of Christmas. The days within the octave are of the 2nd class; the octave day, however, is of the 1st class.

68. The octave of Christmas has its own particular order, namely:

a) on December 26 the feast of St. Stephen the Protomartyr (2nd class) is celebrated;

b) on December 27 the feast of St. John, apostle and evangelist (2nd class) is celebrated;

c) on December 28 the feast of the Holy Innocents, martyrs (2nd class) is celebrated;

d) on December 29 there is a commemoration of St. Thomas, bishop and martyr;

e) on December 31 thereis a commemoration of St. Sylvester I, pope and confessor;

f) of particular feasts, only those are admitted which are of the 1st class and in honor of the saints who are inscribed on these days in the universal calendar, even if they are inscribed only by way of commemoration; the rest are transferred after the octave.

69. On the Sunday within the octave of Christmas, namely that which occurs from December 26 to 31, the office is always of the Sunday with a commemoration of any feast that may occur, according to the rubrics, unless the Sunday falls on a feast of the 1st class, in which case the celebration is of the feast with a commemoration of the Sunday.

70. The special rules for arranging the office and the Mass within the octave of Christmas are found in the rubrics of the breviary and of the missal.

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VIII The Seasons of the Year

A. The Season of Advent

71. The season of holy Advent runs from 1st vespers of the First Sunday of Advent to none of the vigil of Christmas inclusive.

B. Christmastide

72. Christmastide runs from 1st vespers of Christmas to January 13 inclusive.

Within this time are included:

a) the season of Christmas, which runs from 1st vespers of Christmas to none of January 5 inclusive;

b) the season of Epiphany, which runs from 1st vespers of the Epiphany of our Lord to January 13 inclusive.

C. The Season of Septuagesima

73. The season of Septuagesima runs from 1st vespers of the Septuagesima Sunday through compline of Tuesday of Quinquagesima week.

D. The Lenten Season

74. The Lenten season runs from matins of Ash Wednesday up to but not including the Mass of the Easter vigil.

Within this time are included:

a) the season of Lent, which runs from matins of Ash Wednesday through none of the Saturday before the 1st Sunday of the Passion;

b) Passiontide, which runs from 1st vespers of the 1st Sunday of the Passion up to but not including the Mass of the Easter vigil.

75. The week from the 2nd Sunday of the Passion or Palm Sunday to Holy Saturday inclusive is called Holy Week; and the last three days of that week are known as the sacred triduum.

E. Paschaltide

76. Paschaltide runs from the beginning of the Mass of the Easter vigil through none of Saturday within the octave of Pentecost.

Within this time are included:

a) the Easter season, which runs from the beginning of the Mass of the Easter vigil through none of the vigil of the Ascension of our Lord;

b) Ascensiontide, which runs from 1st Vespers of the Ascension of our Lord through none of the vigil of Pentecost;

c) the octave of Pentecost, which runs from the Mass of the vigil of Pentecost through none of the following Saturday.

F. The Season "Throughout the Year"

77. The season "throughout the year" runs from January 14 to none of the Saturday before Septuagesima Sunday, and from 1st vespers of the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, that is, of the First Sunday after Pentecost, through none of the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent.

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IX The Saturday Celebration of the Blessed Virgin Mary

78. On Saturdays on which the office of a feria of the 4th class occurs, the Saturday celebration of the Blessed Virgin Mary is observed.

79. The Saturday office of the Blessed Virgin Mary begins with matins and ends after none.

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X THE Greater and Lesser Litanies

A. The Greater Litanies

80. The greater litanies have been assigned to April 25; but if Easter Sunday or Easter Monday occurs on that day, they are transferred to the following Tuesday.

81. Of the greater litanies there is nothing in the office, but only in the Mass. The commemoration of them, however, is not to be considered a commemoration "of the season."

82. According to conditions and customs varying from one church to another and from one place to another ñ of this matter the local ordinary is the judge ñ a procession is held on this day, in which the Litany of Saints is said with its accompanying prayers. The petitions of the litany are not doubled.

83. If a procession cannot be held, the local ordinary shall prescribe special supplications, which shall include the Litany of the Saints and the other prayers customarily said in procession.

84. All those who are bound to the recitation of the divine office, but do not take part in the procession or in the other special supplications mentioned in the preceding section, must say the Litany of the Saints with its prayers, in Latin, on this day.

85. If, according to the custom of the place, the Litany of the Saints with its prayers is said in the vernacular tongue along with the faithful, in procession or as a part of the other special supplications, those who are bound to the recitation of the divine office and who actually take part in these supplications do not have to repeat these prayers in Latin.

86. The rogation Mass is regularly to be said after the procession, according to what is established in nos. 346-347. It is fitting, however, that the rogation Mass be said even after the special supplications which take the place of the procession, even if these services are held in the evening.

B The Lesser Litanies or Rogation Days

87. The lesser litanies or rogation days, of themselves, are assigned to the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before the feast of the Ascension of our Lord.

Local ordinaries are granted the faculty, however, of transferring them to come other three successive days which are more suitable according to the differences between one region and another or the customs of the needs peculiar to certain regions.

88. Of the lesser litanies there is nothing in the office, but only in the Mass which is connected with the procession or with the other special supplications.

89. With regard to the procession or the other special supplications and the Mass or commemoration, the things established above concerning the greater litanies (nos. 81-83 and 86) shall be observed.

90. On these days the Litany of the Saints with its prayers is said only in procession or as part of the other supplication (see no. 85). Hence, those who are bound to the recitation of the divine office but do not take part in the procession or in the other special supplications do not have to say the Litany of the Saints with its prayers on these days.

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XI The Precedence of Liturgical Days

91. All titles and norms hitherto governing the precedence of liturgical days are annulled. This precedence is governed solely by the following:

Table of Liturgical Days

Arranged in the order of Precedence

Liturgical Days of the First class

1. Christmas day, Easter Sunday and Pentecost Sunday (1st class with octave).

2. The sacred triduum.

3. The feasts of the Epiphany and the Ascension of our Lord, of the Most Holy Trinity, of Corpus Christi, of the Heart of Jesus and of Christ the King.

4. The feasts of the Immaculate Conception and of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 5. The vigil and the octave day of Christmas.

6. The Sundays of Advent, Lent and Passiontide, and Low Sunday.

7. Ferias of the 1st class not mentioned above, namely Ash Wednesday and Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of Holy Week.

8. The commemoration of All the Faithful Departed which, however, yields to a Sunday occurring on its date.

9. The vigil of Pentecost.

10. The days within the octaves of Easter and Pentecost.

11. First class feasts of the universal Church not mentioned above.

12. Proper 1st class feasts, namely:

1) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron: a) of a nation b) of a region or province, whether ecclesisastical or civil; c) of a diocese.

2) the anniversary of the dedication of the cathedral church.

3) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron of a place or town or city.

4) the feast and the anniversary of the dedication of the local church, or public or semi-public oratory which takes the place of a church.

5) the titular feast of the local church.

6) the titular feast of an order or congregation.

7) the feast of a canonized founder of an order or congregation.

8) the feast of a duly constituted principal patron of an order or congregation, and of a religious province.

13. Indult feasts of the 1st class, first the movable, then the fixed.

Liturgical Days of the 2nd Class

14. Second class feasts of our Lord, first the movable, then the fixed.

15. Sundays of the 2nd class.

16. Second class feasts of the universal Church, which are not of the Lord.

17. The days within the octave of Christmas.

18. Ferias of the 2nd class, namely those of Advent from December 17 to 23 inclusive and the ember days of Advent, Lent and September.

19. Proper feasts of the 2nd class, namely:

1) the feast of a duly constituted secondary patron: a) of a nation; b) of a region or province, whether ecclesiastical or civil; c) of a diocese; d) of a place or town or city.

2) feasts of saints or blessed as specified in no. 43d.

3) feasts of saints proper to any church (no. 45c).

4) the feast of a beatified founder of an order or congregation (no. 46b).

5) the feast of a duly constituted secondary patron of an order or congrergation, and of a religious province (no 46d).

6)feasts of saints or blessed as specified in no. 46e.

20. Indult feasts of the 2nd class, first the movable, then the fixed.

21. Vigils of the second class.

Liturgical Days of the 3rd Class

22. The ferias of Lent and passiontide, from Thurday after Ash Wednesday to Saturday before the 2nd Sunday of the Passion inclusive, except on ember days.

23. Feast of the 3rd class inscribed in particular calendars, and first the proper feasts, namely:

1) feasts of saints or blessed as specified in no. 43d.

2) feasts of blessed proper to any church (no. 45d).

3) feasts of saints or blessed as specified in no. 46e; then indult feasts, first the movable, then the fixed.

24. Feasts of the 3rd class inscribed in the calendar of the universal Church, first the movable, then the fixed.

25. The ferias of Advent to December 16 inclusive, except the ember days.

26. Vigils of the 3rd class.

27. Saturday office of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

28. Ferias of the 4th class.



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XII The Occurrence of Liturgical Days

92. Occurrence means the fact of two or more office falling on one and the same day.

Occurrence is called accidental when a movable liturgical day and a fixed liturgical day occur together only at certain intervals of year. It is called perpetual when two liturgical days occur together every year.

93. The effect of occurrence is that the office of the liturgical day of lower rank yields to the office of the higher rank. This may be done by the omission of the lower office, or by its commemoration, or by its transference, or by its reassignment, as indicated in the following sections.

94. A commemoration established on a fixed day is not transferred or reassigned with the feast that is being transferred or reassigned, but is made on its own day or omitted, according to the rubrics.

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XIII The Accidental Occurrence of Liturgical Days and Their Transference

95. Only feasts of the 1st class have the right of transference to another day by reason of their accidental occurrence with a liturgical day which occupies a higher place in the table of precedence. Other feast accidentally impeded by an office of higher rank are either commemorated or omitted altogether in that year, according to the rubrics.

If, however, two feasts of the same divine Person or two feasts of the same saint or blessed occur together, the feast occupying the higher place in the table of precedence is celebrated and the other is omitted.

96. A feast of the 1st class impeded by a day which occupies a higher place in the table of precedence is transferred to the next day following, which is not of the 1st or 2nd class.

However:

a) when the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary is transferred after Easter, it is transferred to the Monday after Low Sunday as its rightful place;

b) when the commemoration of All the Faithful Departed occurs on a Sunday, it is transferred to the following Monday as its rightful place.

97. If several feasts of the 1st class occur on the same day, the feast occupying the higher place in the table of precedence is celebrated on that day, and the others are transferred according to the order in which they have been listed in the table of precedence.

98. Likewise, if it happens that several feasts of the 1st class occurring on successive days are transferred, the order in which they are listed in the table of precedence shall be followed; in case of equal feasts, however, the office which was impeded first has precedence.

99. Transferred feasts hold the same rank that they have in their rightful place.

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XIV The Perpetual Occurrence of Liturgical Days and Their Reassignment

100. The right of reassignment to another day, by reason of perpetual occurrence with a liturgical day occupying a higher place in the table of precedence, belongs to all feasts of the 1st and 2nd class, and also to particular feasts of the 3rd class occurring outside of Advent and Lent which are impeded in the whole diocese or in the whole order or congregation or in the local church.

Third class feasts of the universal Church in a particular calendar, however, and 3rd class feasts of a diocese or of an order or congregation, perpetually impeded only in some churches, are perpetually either commemorated or omitted altogether, according to the rubrics.

101. If feasts to be reassigned are of the 1st or 2nd class, they shall be assigned to the next day following which is not of 1st or 2nd class. If they are of the 3rd class, they shall be assigned to the next day following, which is free from other offices of equal or higher rank.

102. The day to which a feast perpetually impeded has been reassigned is considered as its own day, on which the reassigned feast is celebrated with the same rank as in its rightful place.

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XV The Concurrence of Liturgical Days

103. Concurrence means the meeting of the vespers of the current liturgical day with the 1st vespers of the following liturgical day.

104. In concurrence, the vespers of the liturgical day of higher class are preferred, and the others are commemorated or not, according to the rubrics.

105. But when the liturgical days whose vespers concur are of the same class, the second vespers of the current day are said in their entirety, and there is a commemoration of the following, according to the rubrics.

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XVI Commemorations

106. The rules herein established for commemoration apply both to the Mass and to the office, whether in occurrence or in concurrence.

107. Commemorations are either privileged or ordinary.

108. Privileged commemorations are commemorations:

a) of a Sunday;

b) of a liturgical day of the 1st class;

c) of days within the octave of Christmas;

d) of ember days in September;

e) of the ferias of Advent, Lent and Passiontide;

f) of the greater Litanies, in the Mass.

All other commemorations are ordinary commemorations.

110. In an office and Mass of St. Peter there is always a commemoration of St. Paul, and vice versa. This commemoration is called inseparable, and the two prayers are so thought of as combining into one that they are considered a single prayer in computing the number of collects. Hence:

a) in an office of St. Peter or of St. Paul, the prayer of the other apostle is added to the collect of the day under a single conclusion at lauds and at vespers, without antiphon or verse;

b) in a Mass of St. Peter or of St. Paul, the prayer of the other apostle is added to the collect of the day under a single conclusion;

c) but whenever the prayer of one apostle is to be added by way of commemoration, the other is added to this one immediately, before all other commemorations.

111. The plan for admitting commemorations is this:

a) on 1st class liturgical days and in sung non-conventual Masses, no commemoration is admitted except a privileged one;

b) on 2nd class Sundays, only one commemoration is admitted, namely of a 2nd class feast, which, however, is omitted if a privileged commemoration is to be made;

c) on other 2nd class liturgical days, only one commemoration is admitted, namely either one privileged or one ordinary commemoration;

d) on 3rd and 4th class liturgical days, only two commemorations are admitted.

112. With regard to commemorations and collects, these points also are to be observed:

a) an office, Mass or commemoration of any feast or mystery of one divine Person excludes a commemorations or collect of another feast or mystery of the same divine Person;

b) an office, Mass or commemoration of a Sunday excludes a commemoration or collect of a feast or mystery of the Lord, and vice versa;

c) an office, Mass or commemoration of the seasons excludes another commemoration of the season;

d) likewise, an office, Mass or commemoration of the Blessed Virgin Mary or of any saint or blessed excludes another commemoration or collect in which the intercession of the same Blessed Virgin or saint or blessed is implored; but this does not hold regarding a collect of a Sunday or feria in which the same saint is invoked.

113. A commemoration of the season is given the first place. In admitting and arranging other commemorations, the order of the table of precedence shall be observed.

114. Any commemoration which would exceed the number established for the particular liturgical day is omitted.

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XVII The Conclusion of Prayers

115. The conclusion of prayer both in the Mass and in the office is as follows:

a) if the prayer is addressed to the Father it is concluded: Through our Lord Jesus Christ, thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen;

b) if the prayer is addressed to the Father, but mention is made of the Son in the beginning of it, it is concluded: Through the same Jesus Christ, they Son, our Lord, etc., as above;

c) if the prayer is addressed to the Father, but mention is made of the Son at the end, it is concluded: Who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, would without end. Amen;

d) if the prayer is addressed to the Son, it is concluded: Who livest and reignest with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen;

e) if mention has been made of the Holy Spirit in the prayer, in the conclusion is said: Ö in the unity of the same Holy Spirit, etc.

116. Other special considerations noted at various places in the liturgical books are also to be observed.

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XVIII The Colors of the Vestments

A. The Colors of the Vestments in General

117. The antependium of the altar and the vestments of the celebrant and ministers must be of the color suitable to the office and Mass of the day or to whatever other Mass is to be celebrated, according to the practice of the Roman Church, which customarily uses five colors: white, red, green, violet and black.

The indults and legitimate customs concerning the use of other colors, however, remain in force.

In mission countries, however, it may be that the significance of one or another liturgical color of the Roman Church does not agree with the significance attached to that color by an ancient established tradition of the native population. In such a case, the faculty is given to the Episcopal conference of that region, or of a larger territory if that is expedient, to substitute another, more fitting color for the unsuitable color. This is not to be done, however, without consulting the Sacred Congregation of Rites.

118. With regard to the color of the vestments in low votive Masses of the 4th class, the observations made in no. 323 should be noted.

B. White

119. White is to be used in the office and the Mass of the season:

a) from the feast of Christmas to the end of the Epiphany season;

b) from the Mass of the Easter vigil up to but not including the Mass of the vigil of Pentecost.

120. White is used in the office and the Mass of feasts:

a) of the Lord, except feasts of the mysteries and instruments of the passion;

b) of the Blessed Virgin Mary, also in the blessing of candles and procession on February 2;

c) of the Holy Angels;

d) of All Saints (November 1);

e) of saints who are not martyrs;

f) of St. John, apostle and evangelist (December 27); of the Chair of St. Peter (February 22); of the Conversion of St. Paul (January 25); of the Birthday of St. John the Baptist (June 24).

121. White is required by votive Masses:

a) corresponding to the feasts listed in the preceding section;

b) of our Lord Jesus Christ, eternal High Priest;

c) of the coronation of the pope, and the anniversaries of the pope and of the diocesan bishop;

d) "For Bride and Bridegroom."

122. Finally, white is used on Thursday of Holy Week in the Chrism Mass and in the Mass of the Lord's Supper; also, by the deacon, for the singing of the Easter exaltation, and, by the celebrant, for the renewal of baptismal promises, in the Easter vigil.

C. Red

123. Red is to be used in the office and Mass of the season from the Mass of the vigil of Pentecost to none of the following Saturday.

124. Likewise, red is used in the office and Mass of feasts:

a) of the mysteries and instruments of the Lord's Passion;

b) of the holy apostles and evangelists on their birthday, except on the feast of St. John (December 27);

c) of the commemoration of St. Paul the apostle (June 30);

d) of the commemoration of all holy popes;

e) of holy martyrs whose martyrdom or findings or transferal is celebrated;

f) of holy relics.

125. Red is required by votive Masses:

a) of the Lord's passion;

b) of the Holy Spirit;

c) of the mysteries and the saints listed in the preceeding section;

d) for the election of a pope.

126. Finally, red is used on the 2nd Sunday of the Passion or Palm Sunday for the blessing of branches and the procession.

D. Green

127. Green is used in the office and Mass of the season: a) from January 14 to the Saturday of Septuagesima;

b) from the Monday after the First Sunday after Pentecost to the Saturday before Advent.

Exception are the ember days of September and vigils of the 2nd and 3rd class outside of Paschaltide.

E. Violet

128. Violet is used in the office and Mass of the season:

a) from the first Sunday of Advent to the vigil of Christmas inclusive;

b) from Septuagesima Sunday to the Easter vigil, except: as the blessing of branches and the procession of Second Passion Sunday; at the Chrism Mass and the Mass of the Lord's Supper on Thursday of Holy Week; at the liturgical action of Friday of the Lord's passion and death up to but not including the communion; in the singing of the Easter exultation, for the deacon, and in the renewal of baptismal promises, for the celebrant, in the Easter vigil;

c) on the ember days of September;

d) on vigils of the 2nd and 3rd class outside of Paschaltide.

129. Votive Masses requiring violet are:

a) For the Propagation of the Faith;

b) For the Defense of the Church;

c) For the Unity of the Church;

d) In Time of War;

e) For Peace;

f) In Time of Pestilence;

g) For the Remission of Sins;

h) For Pilgrims and Travelers;

i) For the Sick;

j) For the Grace of a Good Death;

k) For Any Necessity.

130. Violet is used also:

a) at the procession and the Mass of the greater and lesser litanies;

b) at the blessing of ashes;

c) at the communion in the liturgical action of Friday of the Lord's passion and death;

d) in Masses of the commemoration of All the Faithful Departed which are celebrated during exposition of the Blessed Sacrament for the Forty Hours devotion.

131. Rose colored vestments may be used on the Third Sunday of Advent and on the Fourth Sunday of Lent, but only in the office and Mass of the Sunday.

F. Black

132. Black is to be used:

a) in the liturgical action of Friday of the Lord's Passion and Death, up to but not including the communion;

b) in offices and Masses of the dead, except for the case mentioned above, no. 130d.

XIV What Vestments Are to be Worn

133. At Mass the celebrant always wears a chasuble.

134. A bishop and others who are entitled to use the pontificals wear a chasuble over the dalmatic and the tunicle if they are celebrating solemnly.

Likewise, a bishop wears a chasuble over the dalmatic and the tunicle even in a low Mass:

a) in the consecration of a bishop;

b) in the bestowal of holy orders;

c) in the blessing of an abbot;

d) in the blessing of an abbess;

e) in the blessing and the consecration of virgins;

f) in the consecration of a church and of an altar.

For good reason, however, a bishop and the others mentioned above may refrain from wearing the tunicle and the dalmatic under the chasuble.

135. A cope is used:

a) at the office of lauds and vespers when they are said solemnly;

b) in blessings which are done at the altar;

c) in processions;

d) in the absolution over a corpse over a catafalque;

e) in a pontifical Mass, by the assistant priest;

f) at the "solemn prayers" in the liturgical action of Friday of the Lord's passion and death;

g) in the Easter vigil.

136. When the celebrant is wearing a cope he never wears a maniple; and if no cope is to be had, in the blessings done at the altar the priest wears alb and stole without chasuble or maniple.

137. The deacon and the subdeacon wear dalmatic and tunicle respectively when they are ministering to the priest:

a) at the Mass;

b) in the blessings at the altar;

c) in processions.

But when the celebrant has no cope, the ministers likewise leave off the dalmatic and the tunicle.

The folded chasubles and the broad stole are no longer used.

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Fr. Kevin Seasoltz, The New Liturgy: A Documentation, 1903-1966. Herder & Herder, NY, 1966, pp.308-328.
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